Preparing for banking in the future

While FinTech is revolutionizing the banking industry and giving millions of people access to financial services for the first time, new banking models are emerging with FinTech start-ups and tech firms potentially disrupting the status quo. But business schools and universities are not preparing future bankers for these changes, says FinTech thought leader Henri Arslanian. How can designers, programmers and creative thinkers help?

Going digital in Africa

HELPING YOU GET ONLINE

We know that a strong  presence on the web can make a big difference.  Since our humble beginnings in 2014, we've reached thousands of small and mid size enterprises in Senegal. We provide affordable web solutions including domain name registration, hosting, web design, SEO services  and more. Our goal is to expand to other regions in West Africa.

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Business Intelligence

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Cloud Computing

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Cyber Security

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Application Development

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Aviation Transformation

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E-Learning

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EXPANDING AFRICA'S DIGITAL HORIZON

Florence Seriki, the founder and CEO of Omatek, a computer-making  company in Nigeria, addresses the digital divide between Africa and the  rest of the world. How can we help emerging businesses bridge this gap  and simultaneously sensitize leaders?

AFFORDABLE INTERNET FOR AFRICANS

LDCs have made great progress in expanding mobile services and networks

In September 2015, the 2030  Agenda  for  Sustainable  Development was agreed at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit. This new framework is composed of 17 new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), 169 targets, and over 200 indicators. Several targets refer to digital technology, and the 2030 Agenda recognizes that “the spread of information and communication technology & global interconnectedness has great potential to accelerate human progress, to bridge the digital divide and to develop knowledge societies". SDG 9 commits the international community to “significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020”. 

CAN AFRICA JUMP INTO DIGITAL?

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Making the internet better for Africa

By 2034 Africa is expected to have the world’s largest working-age  population of 1.1 billion—yet only 3 to 4 million jobs are created  annually. That means there’s an urgent need to create opportunities for  the millions of people on the continent who are creative, smart and  driven to succeed. The internet, and technology as a whole, offer great  opportunities for creating jobs, growing businesses and boosting  economies. But people need the right skills, tools and products to  navigate the digital world and to make it work for them, their  businesses and their communities.

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Developing APPs for the African market

It is clear that the app economy in Africa represents a tremendous opportunity for developers and users. Mobile phones can contribute to the economic and social development in Africa. The GSMA report estimated that the mobile industry will contribute $214 billion to the GDP. In 2015, the mobile phone ecosystem employed 1.3 million people on the continent. 

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Huge potential for App developers

Did you know the global mobile app market is now worth nearly $25 billion but Africa has almost no share of this mouthwatering cake. Although, our continent is the world’s biggest and fastest growing mobile telephone market after China, we have barely explored the goldmine of apps that are possible on our simple and smart phones.

LAST IN LINE FOR FINANCIAL INCLUSION

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Opportunities for Digital Financial Services in the Cocoa Value Chain in Côte d’Ivoire

Managing money can be particularly challenging for farmers since they receive the majority of their income during the harvest and this needs to cover their expenses for the rest of the year. To understand better the farmers’ cash flow challenges and the ways that digital financial services could help alleviate some of the burden, IFC has undertaken research into the financial lives of cocoa farmers in Côte d’Ivoire. The World Bank Group is committed to enabling the financial inclusion of one billion people by 2020. 

DFS AND COCOA FARMERS IN AFRICA

Meet Lucien, a cocoa farmer in Côte d’Ivoire. Lucien uses an innovative  mobile phone-based savings product introduced by Advans  to help manage  his finances.

DIGITAL DATA SYSTEM FOR FARMERS

What data can financial institutions bank on?

How can digital data relevant to small

holder farmer activity be used to unlock better access to finance? What types of digital data are most likely to help financial institutions assess and price the various risks smallholder farmers face (which include timely input/offtake, weather, market price risk) and reduce the need to send loan officers across long distances to visit the farms?

THE NEXT MACHINE LEARNING FRONTIER

 Agriculture is a less familiar research domain among the machine  learning community. Nevertheless, this domain offers unique and  challenging scientific opportunities related to the spatio-temporal  nature of the data, the multi-resolution data sources, the interaction  with environmental models.

IS BITCOIN THE ANSWER FOR AFRICA?

Breaking a Bubble in the digitized world, Bitcoin has emerged as one of  breathtaking change in the worldwide accepted currencies.  In this  video, find out the opinions of Business giants about the future of  Bitcoin.

E-COMMERCE: THE WAY FORWARD

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Africa; electronic commerce, information and communication technologies, SMEs.

The landscape of trade is constantly evolving. And the way that goods and services cross borders is transforming. Businesses today can use the Internet to manage almost every business process, from product sourcing and purchase to financial management, sales, marketing and distribution, cutting down on costs and reaching new markets. The growth of e-commerce is a unique opportunity to open access to international markets for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in developing and least developed countries (LDCs). 

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With smartphone use and web penetration soaring, Africa is set for a tech revolution – but only if its infrastructure can support it

You  can buy sunlight with your phone, conduct an eye test on someone 100  miles away and attend a church service on your iPad. There are apps for  investing in cows, for sending parcels and for mapping unrest. And soon  you’ll be able to deliver blood and medicines by drone. There’s free Facebook, mobile banking, and the promise of  cashless societies and digitised land records. And from Accra in the  west to Kigali in the east, a spray of “tech hubs” talk about  “leapfrogging” technology and incubating start-ups. 

THE TRANSFORMATIVE POWER OF MOBILE

Africa is one of the fastest growing mobile regions in the world and has also become a cradle for creative innovation. At TEDxLugano, Julian Pistone and David Steinacker – the dynamic duo from Google – share their experience and knowledge of the widespread mobile technology in Africa and the power and transformative impact mobile could have in Africa. 

IS AFRICA THE NEXT GLOBAL SUPER STAR?

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Feeding Africa and the world

    

Africat has enormous potential, not only to feed itself and eliminate hunger and food insecurity, but also to be a major player in global food markets. This potential lies in its land, water and oceans, in its men and women, in its knowledge and huge markets. Recognizing this opportunity, the African Union chose 10 years ago to make agriculture one of the pillars of the New Partnership for African Development. 

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The business of smallholder farmers in Africa

Among 500 million small farms in the world standing on less than 2 hectares each, 41 million exist in Africa, accounting for 80% of all the farms in the continent (Lowder, Skoet, & Raney, 2016). These farms represent a diverse group of agricultural households and farmers which could be categorized differently, using various aspects such as size of landholdings, access to markets, and income levels. Smallholder farmers are the frontline of Africa's food supply and are currently severely handicapped in their ability to manage their farms as a business including limited access to financial products and services to improve and render more effective their ability to grow. Digital Financial Services can make a difference and help farmers improve their effective and capacity to grow and organize.

BITCOIN- THE ROAD AHEAD

A software developer called Satoshi Nakamoto proposed bitcoin, which was an electronic payment system based on mathematical proof. The idea was to produce a currency independent of any central authority, transferable electronically, more or less instantly, with very low transaction fees.

CUSTOMERS SHOW THE WAY

In Sub-Saharan Africa, mobile banking makes lives easier; for traders to  buy produce from the villages, for people to keep money safe and to  save for the future, for parents to easily pay for school fees. Airtel  Money Uganda, a digital financial services provider supported by IFC,  the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and other partners under the  Partnership for Financial Inclusion, has brought digital financial  services to 2.1 million people through an agent network.

MOBILE MONEY IN VALUE CHAINS

The role of mobile in driving effciency and sustainability in agriculture value chains

Mobile can help farmers improve agricultural productivity by giving them access to basic  nancial services, new agricultural techniques and new markets, in turn helping them to secure better prices for crops and a better return on investments. As their income improves with each harvest, they can invest in better seeds, fertiliser and chemicals. 


The greatest potential for improving farmers’ income comes from access to  nancial payments and agricultural information via mobile, together delivering approximately 75% of the total increase in agricultural income.      

Improving the lives of farmers could have a particular impact on women. Over half of agricultural workers are women23 and in some countries as many as 70%24. 


Despite women’s substantial contribution – they produce around half the world’s food – rural women in developing countries often have less access than men to education or training, and fewer rights to land. The solutions outlined in this report have the potential to boost women’s productivity in agriculture, but to achieve this potential, they must be tailored to women’s specific needs and must be marketed in ways that appeal to women. 


Mobile telecommunications can also help food growers, buyers, distributors and exporters to trade with each other, help them track the movements of agricultural inputs and food items, and help companies to increase transport effciency. 

DIGITIZING AGRICULTURAL VALUE CHAINS

Innovative solutions through the mobile service industry now provides smallholder farmers with access to information and affordable financial services - appropriate savings, credit, microinsurance. Technology is advancing  financial inclusion for smallholder farmers - distribution of fertilizers and digitization of payments resulting in price transparency, lower transaction costs for loans, more convenient access to credit, savings and payment options. Learn More

TRANSFORMING AFRICAN FARMERS

Digital technologies have enormous power to change the way farmers will  grow food in the future. In Africa, where farmers struggle in a harsh  environment to grow crops with irrigation as efficiently as possible,  sensors to measure soil moisture are being used to assist with farm  decisions.  A simple digital device is helping to grow more food with  less water, overcome community conflicts over water, and creating jobs  for rural poor. 

IS AFRICA TAKING DIGITAL TO THE NEXT LEVEL?

Mojaloop is open-source software for creating interoperable payments  platforms that connect all digital financial providers and customers. It  was designed by a team of tech and fintech innovators, with support  from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to make digital financial  systems more integrated and inclusive, especially in developing markets  where many people don't have access to basic services like bank accounts  and payment cards. Learn More